NIH and Prostate Cancer Foundation Launch Large Study on Aggressive Prostate Cancer in African-American Men

African American men are more likely to get aggressive prostate cancer, which grows and spreads quickly, compared to other men. RESPOND is a new study that aims to understand why this is. The NIH and Prostate Cancer Foundation are funding the study, which will enroll 10,000 African American men with prostate cancer to look at the role of genes (DNA), social stress, and other risk factors.

African-American men have about a 15 percent chance of developing prostate cancer. While, white men have about a 10 percent chance of developing prostate cancer. African-American men are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive disease. The risk of dying from prostate cancer is about 4 percent for African-American men  and about 2 percent for white men. Researchers plan to learn more about why these disparities exist from this study.

Investigators in the study will examine possible associations between aggressive disease and exposures to neighborhood/environmental stressors such as discrimination, early-life adversity, and segregation. They will also study DNA and tumor samples to identify gene variants associated with aggressive prostate cancer. Once researchers have identified genetic changes associated with aggressive prostate cancer, they will investigate how the social environment interacts with those genetic changes.

To read more about this study please visit the link below.

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-prostate-cancer-foundation-launch-large-study-aggressive-prostate-cancer-african-american-men

 

NIH and Prostate Cancer Foundation Launch Large Study on Aggressive Prostate Cancer in African-American Men” originally published by the National Institute of Health